Russia and China:
Saga of Two Transitions to Market Economy


Rutland P.,

Professor of Government, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, prutland@wesleyan.edu



For citation:

Rutland P. Russia and China: Saga of Two Transitions to Market Economy . – Polis. Political Studies. 2009. No. 3. P. 162-176. (In Russ.)



Abstract

Both China and the Soviet Union and China embarked on a process of social transformation in the 1980s. The initial conditions were very different in the two countries (highly industrialized versus subsistence agriculture); and the leadership adopted very different strategies (democracy and economic liberalization versus continued Communist rule and a controlled market transition). Despite starting in different places and heading in different directions, they seem to be converging on a common end-point: an authoritarian, regulated market economy. Why is this so?

 


Content No. 3, 2009

See also:


Lukin A.V.,
Russia and China in Greater Eurasia. – Polis. Political Studies. 2020. No5

Simon G.,
Russia and Ukraine Ten Years after the Downfall of the Communist Regime. – Polis. Political Studies. 2000. No6

Round Table of the «Polis» Journal, Streltsov D.V., Chugrov S.V., Karelova L.B., Oznobishchev S.K.,
Russia and Japan. Part II. View from Russia. – Polis. Political Studies. 2014. No1

Nezhdanov D.V., Rusakova O.F.,
«Political market» as system-forming metaphor of modern political-science discourse. – Polis. Political Studies. 2011. No4

Klimenko E.V.,
Integration of the Diversity. Formation of the Civic Nation in Russia. – Polis. Political Studies. 2015. No6

 

   

Introducing an article



Polis. Political Studies
3 2010


Nedyak I.L.
Political marketing

 The article text
 

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